Tinnitus: Have You Tried High Power Laser Therapy

Published: 05th July 2010
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Tinnitus is a condition for which laser therapy can be effective and yet many are not aware that this option exists. Laser therapy has been shown to reduce inflammation, reduce fibrous tissue formation, improve vascular activity, accelerate tissue repair and cell growth as well as improve nerve function. Tinnitus is the perception of ringing in the ears when no ringing is really present. Tinnitus is, therefore, a symptom and not medical condition but can be part of the signs and symptoms associated with various causes. This symptom can, however, be very annoying to the patient and at times very difficult to treat for the physician depending on what the underlying cause of the tinnitus is. There have been no reported negative effects from laser therapy when used by a qualified and experienced practitioner and as you can see from the list above, there are many possible benefits for a patient with a stubborn case of tinnitus. My experience as a pioneer in the use of High Power Laser Therapy in the United States with Tinnitus has been very positive and its effectiveness on an individual basis can be determined fairly easily with a short trial period. The advantage of High Power Laser Therapy over low level lasers is its ability to penetrate deeper and reach the target tissue. Many times low level laser energy is absorbed by the more superficial covering tissues and, therefore, becomes ineffective before reaching the tissue in question. High Power Laser Therapy also delivers more energy to the tissue per unit of time. The purpose of this article is to make those suffering with tinnitus aware that this option is available to them. Below you will find a few journal articles regarding laser therapy and tinnitus.

Int Tinnitus J. 2008;14(2):175-80.

Effectiveness of combined counseling and low-level laser stimulation in the treatment of disturbing chronic tinnitus.

Cuda D, De Caria A.

Department of Otolaryngology, Guglielmo da Saliceto Hospital, Piacenza, Italy. d.cuda@ausl.pc.it

Abstract

We recruited 46 adult patients affected by disturbing tinnitus lasting for at least 3 years. All were treated with a combined counseling protocol constituting hypnotherapeutic and muscle relaxation techniques. We randomly assigned 26 patients to the group receiving low-level laser stimulation treatment and 20 to the placebo group. The laser power was 5 mV and the wavelength 650 nm. The irradiation lasted 20 minutes daily for 3 months. The Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) questionnaire was submitted at the beginning and at the end of treatment. The THI scores improved in the entire sample after treatment but more significantly in the group receiving low-level laser stimulation. From the point of view of clinical classification, approximately 61% of irradiated patients had tinnitus severity decreased by one class, in comparison to 35% of the placebo group.

PMID: 19205171 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

J Laryngol Otol. 2008 May;122(5):447-51. Epub 2007 Jul 12.

Effectiveness of transmeatal low power laser irradiation for chronic tinnitus.

Gungor A, Dogru S, Cincik H, Erkul E, Poyrazoglu E.

Department of Otolaryngology, Haydarpasa Military Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate effectiveness of 5 mW laser irradiation in the treatment of chronic tinnitus. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective, randomised, double-blind study.Methods:This investigation included 66 ears in 45 patients with chronic unilateral or bilateral tinnitus. A 5 mW laser with a wavelength of 650 nm, or placebo laser, was applied transmeatally for 15 minutes, once daily for a week. A questionnaire was administered which asked patients to score their symptoms on a five-point scale, before and two weeks after laser irradiation. A decrease of one scale point, regarding the loudness, duration and degree of annoyance of tinnitus, was accepted to represent an improvement. RESULTS: The loudness, duration and degree of annoyance of tinnitus were improved, respectively, in up to 48.8, 57.7 and 55.5 per cent of the patients in the active laser group. No significant improvement was observed in the placebo laser group. CONCLUSION: Transmeatal, low power (5 mW) laser irradiation was found to be useful for the treatment of chronic tinnitus.

PMID: 17625032 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Lasers Med Sci. 2003;18(3):154-61.

Transmeatal cochlear laser (TCL) treatment of cochlear dysfunction: a feasibility study for chronic tinnitus.

Tauber S, Schorn K, Beyer W, Baumgartner R.

Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, D-81377 Munich, FRG. drtauber@yahoo.de

Abstract

Low-level-laser-therapy (LLLT) targeting the inner ear has been discussed as a therapeutic procedure for cochlear dysfunction such as chronic cochlear tinnitus or sensorineural hearing loss. Former studies demonstrate dose-dependent biological and physiological effects of LLLT such as enhanced recovery of peripheral nerve injuries, which could be of therapeutic interest in cochlear dysfunction. To date, in patients with chronic tinnitus mastoidal and transmeatal irradiation has been performed without systematic dosimetric assessment. However, light-dosimetric studies on human temporal bones demonstrated that controlled application of laserlight to the human cochlea depends on defined radiator position within the external auditory meatus. This feasibility study first presents a laser application system enabling dose-controlled transmeatal cochlear laser-irradiation (TCL), as well as preliminary clinical results in patients with chronic cochlear tinnitus. The novel laser TCL-system, consisting of four diode lasers (lambda=635 nm-830 nm) and a new specific head-set applicator, was developed on the basis of dosimetric data from a former light-dosimetric study. In a preliminary clinical study, the TCL-system was applied to 35 patients with chronic tinnitus and sensorineural hearing loss. The chronic symptoms persisted after standard therapeutic procedures for at least six months, while retrocochlear or middle-ear pathologies have been ruled out. The patients were randomised and received five single diode laser treatments (lambda=635 nm, 7.8 mW cw, n=17 and lambda=830 nm, 20 mW cw, n=18) with a space irradiation of 4 J/cm2 site of maximal cochlear injury. For evaluation of laser-induced effects complete otolaryngologic examinations with audiometry, tinnitus masking and matching, and a tinnitus-self-assessment were performed before, during and after the laser-irradiation. The first clinical use of the TCL-system has been well tolerated without side-effects and produced no observable damage to the external, middle or inner ear. Changes of tinnitus loudness and tinnitus matching have been described. After a follow-up period of six months tinnitus loudness was attenuated in 13 of 35 irradiated patients, while two of 35 patients reported their tinnitus as totally absent. Hearing threshold levels and middle ear function remained unchanged. Further investigations by large double-blind placebo-controlled studies are mandatory for clinical evaluation of the presented TCL-system and its therapeutic effectiveness in acute and chronic cochlear dysfunction.

PMID: 14505199 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Dr. Nelson Mane D.C. is a chiropractic physician certified in both chiropractic orthopedics and neurology. He has sub specialty training in childhood neurobehavioral disorders as well as vestibular disorders and electro diagnostics. He was one of 11 doctors out of 60,000 chosen by the American Chiropractic Association to start the first Chiropractic neurology board back in 1989.Dr Mane is a D.A.N. (Defeat Autism Now) doctor. He is considered a pioneer in the use of Hemispheric Integration Therapy for the treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorders. For more information regarding Dr. Nelson Mane D.C. and his unique approach combining functional medicine with Hemispheric Integration Therapy go to www.Hitautism.com.

For more information about Dr. Nelson Mane, D.C. and his treatment approach for ASD go to http://www.manecenter.com/ADHD.htm.




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